Asparagus

Asparagus

What Asparagus Can Do

It may not be the first thing you think of when the Westmoreland Berry Farm is mentioned, and it’s not even a berry. But asparagus does make for one delicious, green vegetable. Asparagus is normally harvested and eaten when the plant is very young, as when it grows older it becomes coarse and “wood-like” before developing¬†into a fern. Visitors to the Farm have commented that the asparagus is tender, has a delicious flavor and requires very little cooking, whether it’s being steamed, roasted or grilled.

How We Grow Asparagus

 

Asparagus is first planted as a crown, or roots, and often resembles an assortment of pencils planted in the dirt. A crop of asparagus is harvested in three distinct phases. The first phase takes approximately one week and usually occurs in the early spring. After this week of growth, the asparagus is allowed to grow further and develop into a fern. The second harvest occurs two or three weeks later and is again followed by a third harvest, which traditionally occurs in the middle of June. After this third and final harvest, the entire crop is grown out, mowed in the early spring and then prepared for the new year’s harvest.

Dr. Berry's

Growth Facts

Temperature

Temperature

Asparagus is versatile but grows best in regions that experience cool winters.

Water

Water

Asparagus requires regular watering, but also proper drainage for the best yield.

Growth Time

Growth Time

Asparagus can take three growing seasons until the crop is ready for harvest.

Treatment

Treatment

Asparagus must be harvested while it is young, before it turns hard and "wood-like."

Growth Calendar

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